Mar 192012
 

Block Diagram of Colour Television

According to Block Diagram of Colour Television Sets In a colour television receiver, additional circuits are provided to deal with the colour.

The only difference between black and White Television set and colour Television set is the IF circuit is the importance of bandwidth for colour receivers. Remember that video frequencies around 3.58 MHz just show details in monochrome, but these frequencies are essential for colour information. Without them, there is no colour. This is why the fine tuning control on colour television sets must be tuned exactly, or else the colour disappears, along with the higher resolution.

The sound is usually taken off before the video detector in colour sets, and a separate converter is used for it, instead of taking it from the video detector. The reason that this is done is to minimize a 920 KHz beat signal that can result between the 3.58 MHz colour subcarrier and the sound carrier signal. This signal would show up as interference in the television picture.

Block Diagram of Colour Television Sets


The output from the video detector is sent to two places: a series of colour circuits, and a luminance output amplifier.

The luminance amplifier also serves as a cutoff filter for frequencies above 3.2 MHz, thus removing all colour information from the luminance video signal and, alas, some of the sharpness and detail. On this amplifier is where you will find your brightness and contrast controls.

In the colour recovery circuits, several things happen. First, the video detector's output is sent through a colour "band pass" filter, which leaves us with just the chrominance information – the luminance has been removed. This chroma output contains both the colour information for the picture, and the colour burst. It is then sent to a burst separator to detect the phase and level of the colour burst. This is where you’ll find your "colour" control. Now we'll have a reference for the colours within the picture, which is sent to a crystal oscillator which generates constant 3.58 MHz subcarrier of the correct phase. This oscillator’s phase can be adjusted – this is your hue control. The oscillator is used with two colour demodulators to recover the R-Y and B-Y colour difference signals. The continuous wave subcarrier is delayed by 90 degrees of phase before it enters the R-Y demodulator. The R-Y and B-Y signals are combined further to recover the G-Y signal.

All three signals are then sent to the colour picture tube's grids. There, they are combined with three luminance drive signals in the correct proportions, giving us our familiar RGB signals for driving the electron guns within the picture tube to re-create the colour television picture.

When satellite television first hit the market in the early 1990s, home dishes were expensive metal units that took up a huge chunk of yard space. In these early years, only the most die-hard TV fans would go through all the hassle and expense of putting in their own dish. Satellite TV was a lot harder to get than broadcast and cable TV.

Today, you see compact satellite dishes perched on rooftops all over the United States. Drive through rural areas beyond the reach of the cable companies, and you'll find dishes on just about every house. The major satellite TV companies are luring in more consumers every day with movies, sporting events and news from around the world and the promise of movie-quality picture and sound.

Satellite TV offers many solutions to broadcast and cable TV problems. Though satellite TV technology is still evolving, it has already become a popular choice for many TV viewers.

In this article, we'll find out how satellite TV works, from TV station to TV set. We'll also learn about the changing landscape of TV viewing and some basic differences that distinguish satellite TV from cable and over-the-air broadcast TV.

The output from the video detector is sent to two places: a series of colour circuits, and a luminance output amplifier.

The luminance amplifier also serves as a cutoff filter for frequencies above 3.2 MHz, thus removing all colour information from the luminance video signal and, alas, some of the sharpness and detail. On this amplifier is where you will find your brightness and contrast controls.

In the colour recovery circuits, several things happen. First, the video detector's output is sent through a colour "band pass" filter, which leaves us with just the chrominance information – the luminance has been removed. This chroma output contains both the colour information for the picture, and the colour burst. It is then sent to a burst separator to detect the phase and level of the colour burst. This is where you’ll find your "colour" control. Now we'll have a reference for the colours within the picture, which is sent to a crystal oscillator which generates constant 3.58 MHz subcarrier of the correct phase. This oscillator’s phase can be adjusted – this is your hue control. The oscillator is used with two colour demodulators to recover the R-Y and B-Y colour difference signals. The continuous wave subcarrier is delayed by 90 degrees of phase before it enters the R-Y demodulator. The R-Y and B-Y signals are combined further to recover the G-Y signal.

All three signals are then sent to the colour picture tube's grids. There, they are combined with three luminance drive signals in the correct proportions, giving us our familiar RGB signals for driving the electron guns within the picture tube to re-create the colour television picture.

When satellite television first hit the market in the early 1990s, home dishes were expensive metal units that took up a huge chunk of yard space. In these early years, only the most die-hard TV fans would go through all the hassle and expense of putting in their own dish. Satellite TV was a lot harder to get than broadcast and cable TV.

Today, you see compact satellite dishes perched on rooftops all over the United States. Drive through rural areas beyond the reach of the cable companies, and you'll find dishes on just about every house. The major satellite TV companies are luring in more consumers every day with movies, sporting events and news from around the world and the promise of movie-quality picture and sound.

Satellite TV offers many solutions to broadcast and cable TV problems. Though satellite TV technology is still evolving, it has already become a popular choice for many TV viewers.

In this article, we'll find out how satellite TV works, from TV station to TV set. We'll also learn about the changing landscape of TV viewing and some basic differences that distinguish satellite TV from cable and over-the-air broadcast TV.

  6 Responses to “Block Diagram of Colour Television Sets”

  1. Hmm is anyone else encountering problems with the pictures on this blog
    loading? I’m trying to find out if its a problem on my end or if it’s the
    blog. Any responses would be greatly appreciated.

  2. hello!,I love your writing so much! proportion we communicate more approximately maillot de foot pas cher your post on AOL? I require a specialist in this area to solve my problem. Maybe that is you! Looking ahead to peer you.

  3. Thank you for some other informative website. Where else could I get that kind of info written in such an ideal approach? I have a venture that I'm just now running on, and I have been at the glance out for such information. very good information of Block Diagram of Colour Television Sets. Thanks

  4. thanks. . . it’s been helpful.

  5. I actually can’t belive this short article shown up in Google News! Good work! Yahoo or google likes your individual authoring!

  6. Hey! Someone in my Myspace group shared this site with us
    so I came to give it a look. I’m definitely
    loving the information. I’m bookmarking and will be tweeting this to my
    followers! Fantastic blog and fantastic design.

 Leave a Reply

(required)

(required)

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>